Uncc Paris Agreement

Historically, multilateral climate negotiations have been difficult because all countries have been trying to protect their national interests. That is why the commitment made in Paris is considered a successful breakthrough. In addition to setting an overall temperature increase target of 2°C/1.5°C, the agreement also includes a commitment to increase climate change financing, financial support from industrialized countries to developing countries, and the development of a national mitigation plan by 2020 with its own goals and targets; protect ecosystems, enhance adaptation and reduce vulnerability to the effects of climate change. Three years ago, all Parisian countries agreed to resist a rise in global temperatures below 2°C above pre-industrial temperatures and try to raise the temperature to a maximum of 1.5°C. Today, in Katowice, the parties are working to agree on how to jointly achieve the Paris Commitment, build trust between different countries and implement the Paris Agreement in a coherent manner. This article was written by UN CC: Learn Ambassador Doddy Sukadri, who is actively involved in low-carbon development strategy, carbon market and trade, as well as issues related to climate change. The last meeting of the COP24 climate negotiations in Katowice, Poland, has been postponed several times because more than 100 ministers and more than 1,000 negotiators have tried to overcome their differences over how to implement the „Paris regulatory framework” in each country. After a lively debate, the COP24 conference, which was due to end on Friday 14 December 2018, was closed on Sunday 16 December in the morning at 00:33 Katowice time. Climate change is not a nightmare, it is a reality that we must face together. So far, we can see the effects of climate change anywhere. decrease in agricultural production due to seasonal insecurity, floods and droughts; the emergence of new pests and diseases that had never been known before; decrease in fisheries production due to changes in marine ecosystems and damage to coral reefs; and several disasters that we have often seen in recent times. According to the Natural Disaster Management Agency (BNPB), more than 80% of the national disasters that occur in Indonesia are due to climate change. What the government needs now is to deal with governance and governance in climate change, both centrally and subnationally.

At the central level, it is absolutely necessary to have cohesion between ministries/agencies heavily involved in the work of climate change, so that roles and authority do not overlap. The role of the coordinating ministry of the economy must be even greater to ensure synergistic, effective and effective coordination among ministries involved in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and achieving a low-carbon economy. At the subnational level, there is also a need for harmony between the roles and authorities of governors, regents, mayors and technical offices. Measuring the successful management of climate change could be implemented at the subnational level. Therefore, all efforts, including technological assistance, financing and capacity building to address climate change, are focused on subnational regions and not at the national level. . . .